780.432.7297

Optimum Care for Cats

Good preventive health care for your new kitten or adult cat makes a big difference in their lives. The Optimum Care program is designed to reduce the cost of pet ownership by providing routine care to reduce the risk of disease through early detection.

Select Your Plan
Basic
per month Call
Best Plan
Enhanced
per month Call
Basic
per month Call
Best Plan
Enhanced
per month Call
Five (5) no-charge office visits
Five (5) no-charge office visits
Routine vaccinations*
Routine vaccinations*
Nail trims
Nail trims
Deworming
Deworming
Nutritional consultation
Nutritional consultation
Growth/body condition monitoring
Growth/body condition monitoring
Spay or neuter pre-anesthetic blood panel
Spay or neuter pre-anesthetic blood panel
Spay or neuter**
Spay or neuter**
Health certificates
Health certificates
Basic wellness blood panel
Basic wellness blood panel
Dental cleaning
Dental cleaning

Enrollment Fee: Please give us a call at 780.432.7297 
* Service excludes Feline Leukemia vaccine
** Additional charges will apply for in heat, cryptorchids, retained deciduous teeth etc.

Questions & Answers

Optimum Care is a program of preventive health care plans specifically designed for your cats and dogs. The program takes a group of core services and offers them at a discounted rate. Plan members pay through annual or monthly payments, making budgeting for a pet’s health care needs easier and more convenient.

No. Pet insurance is designed to protect against your pet’s unexpected accidents and illnesses. Our plans provide optimal wellness healthcare for your pet, based on their lifestyle and needs. The plan allows you to spread payments over a 12 month period while providing you with excellent value, special pricing and discounts.

The enrollment fee and first monthly payment are due at the time of sign-up. You just need to read and sign a simple contract and fill out and sign a document that permits the monthly withdrawals from your bank account by debit, or charges to your credit card.

Yes. You can choose to pay for the plan in its entirety (including enrollment fee) at the time you sign up. You will be notified proactively as your plan comes up for renewal. You can continue with the existing plan or a new plan where you can elect to do a lump sum payment for the year again or go to the monthly option if you prefer.

You can change from the Basic to the Enhanced Plan any time during the year – a change from Enhanced to Basic needs to occur at the year anniversary date.

No. The plan will automatically renew on the anniversary date without an enrollment fee. We will contact you approximately 30 days prior to the plan renewal date. Plans that are renewed after 30 days of the previous plan expiring will require the enrollment fee to be applied.

Yes. Our hospital requires appointments so we can provide excellent service to all our clients and patients. For our plan members, you are more than welcome to contact us about “day-stay appointments”, where you leave your pet with us for the day or portion of the day at no additional charge.

Your second pet will receive a 50% discount off the enrollment fee. Any additional pets have no enrollment fee upon signing up for the plans.

In these circumstances, you are welcome to pay the difference between the out-of-plan costs of the services used to date, and the total monthly installments paid.

Losing a pet is very emotional. We understand this and will consider the plan paid in full, with no further payment required.
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Stacy Sharlen

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Needed a vet in Edmonton and was so happy to find this place. The vets were friendly and knowledgeable and…

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Blog

My Dental Cleaning by Carrots the Clinic Cat

I recently had my check-up with Dr. B, and he mentioned that I have a lot of tartar on my teeth and something called a resorptive lesion. I had been noticing that my mouth wasn’t feeling so clean, and it did hurt when I ate my kibble. Dr. B recommended that I have my teeth cleaned, and they would remove the bad teeth at the same time so that I wouldn’t be in any more pain. I was pretty nervous as it was my first time, but I see the staff here do it almost every day, so I figured I could be brave for one day. I asked the Techs to take pictures during my dental so that I could show you all that happens, and hopefully, you wouldn’t be so nervous if you need a Dental too! The first part was the worst part. The girls forgot to give me dinner the night before my procedure and then they didn’t give me breakfast either! I tried to explain to them, but they said it wasn’t safe to eat before you go under anesthetic. My stomach was saying otherwise, but the girls wanted to make sure my dental cleaning was as safe as possible. This is why they did blood work on me a couple of days before my procedure, as well. They started by giving me an injection in my hind leg to make me feel a bit sleepy, and it also offers some pain control. They let me relax for a little bit in a kennel before they brought me out to the dental table. My front leg was shaved, and a catheter was put into my vein. The clippers tickled, and the catheter poke wasn’t too bad, but then they put a whole bunch of tape on my leg to keep it in place. The tape was the worst part because I knew they’d be ripping it off later! The tech then checked my vitals to make sure everything was good. She then told me I was going to feel sleepy. She gave me an injection through the catheter in my front leg. Boy was she right, sleepy I got! I tried to keep my eyes open, but they just kept getting heavier and heavier. Now what happened next is a bit foggy, but I went into a nice deep sleep. During my sleep, the tech placed an endotracheal tube into my trachea (orange tube in the photo). This was to ensure I could breathe the entire time and so that water and debris couldn’t go into my lungs. The tube is hooked up to oxygen and a gas anesthetic to make sure I stay asleep for the entire procedure, as well. She also put gauze in the back of my throat for extra protection. She then cleaned my teeth with an ultrasonic scaler. It makes a high pitched noise, so I was glad I was under so I couldn’t hear it. My teeth were cleaned above and below the gum line. Apparently, tartar can build up down there too. The tech told me it’s similar to when she goes to the dentist, but she’s allowed to stay awake since she doesn’t bite the dental hygienist. I’m sure there are some humans that do bite, though! Then the tech looked closely at all my teeth and wrote down anything important on my chart. She also put a probe down between my gums and each tooth to ensure there aren’t any large pockets that could cause me issues. Big pockets are great spots for bacteria and tartar to hide, and I sure don’t want any of those anymore. Luckily I didn’t have any fractured or broken teeth and no big pockets. They did find two teeth that were resorptive lesions. These were the culprits causing me some discomfort, so they had to be extracted. Dr. B asked the girls to x-ray these teeth to see how much damage there was underneath the gum line so that he would know how to remove them. We recently upgraded to digital dental x-rays, and I was lucky to be one of the first to test it out. You can see in the photo my x-ray on the laptop. The roots of those teeth were all eaten away, so Dr. B did a crown amputation. He told me that it means just the top of the tooth that you can see is removed as almost all of the tooth below the gums were gone. He then sutured the extraction sites closed so that they would heal well and to prevent food and debris (from me grooming myself) from going inside and causing an infection. Once Dr. B was done, the tech double-checked that everything was nice and clean. She then polished my teeth with a minty paste. She didn’t let me pick my flavour of polish, but we don’t have fish flavoured anyways. She then put on fluoride that had to sit on my teeth for a bit and then it was all wiped off. The tech made sure that she wiped off all of the fluoride as it isn’t safe for me to swallow when I woke up. This is why pets have special toothpaste, and we can’t share with you humans. Once all the fluoride was wiped off my teeth, the tech made sure the gauze was out of my throat, and everything looked good. It was now time for me to wake up. They turn off the anesthetic gas so that I am just breathing oxygen, and I slowly came around. They don’t take out the endotracheal tube until I am awake enough to breathe on my own safely. This was when I started to remember again what happened. I woke up with a minty fresh mouth, but I was very confused. The girls tried to assure me that everything went well and that I was safe in their arms, but I was too confused. So, of course, I tried to wiggle about and figure things out for myself. Don’t they know I’m an independent cat? The tech held me safe until I was a little more with it even with my protest. I have to admit I was feeling the drugs for quite a while. They made sure I could walk and jump well before I was allowed to free roam the clinic again that night. They also made me a bunch of nice cozy beds on the floor around the clinic so that I wouldn’t have to jump up on anything, which was good because I was still feeling a bit off all night. For the next couple of days, the girls gave me a pain medication, which I hate to admit was delicious. I pretended that I was upset getting it, but boy was it chicken flavoured delight, and I made sure to lick every last drop off of my lips. Hopefully, by knowing what the process is, it will help you feel a bit less nervous about your dental cleaning, and if your humans have any questions about Dental cleanings or preventative measures, the staff here are always willing to discuss them.

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